Nicolaus of Damascus

Learning from 40 AC Book Bios “Καῖσαρ” Kai-Caros (in Slavic "Like the King") Bio of Caesar Sunday 27 September 2020 at 5:55 pm

Nicolaus of Damascus Book Bios “Καῖσαρ” KaiCaros (in Slavic "Like the King") Bio of Ceazar

By Nataša Pantović

The Ancient Greek historian Nikolas or Nicolaus of Damascus (Greek: Νικόλαος Δαμασκηνός) was a historian and philosopher with a Slavic name who lived during the Augustan age of the so-called Roman Empire. He was born in 64 BC. Nicolaus was the son of wealthy parents, and historians suggest that he was of Macedonian origin.

A fragment from Alfredus the Englishman’s translation of Nicolaus of Damascus’ work on plants now lost which incorporates material from Aristotle’s De Plantis also lost Alfredus translated Nicolaus’ book from Arabic which had been translated from Syriac which had been translated in turn from Greek

A fragment from Alfredus the Englishman’s translation of Nicolaus of Damascus’ work on plants, now lost, which incorporates material from Aristotle’s De Plantis, also lost. Alfredus translated Nicolaus’ book from Arabic, which had been translated from Syriac, which had been translated in turn from Greek: Harley MS 5414, f. 72

He was an intimate friend of Herod the Great (Cezar). According to Sophronius, he was also the tutor of the children of Mark Antony and Cleopatra. He was commissioned for his work. He wrote a universal history in 144 books. His work was mainly lost. Extensive fragments of the first seven books are preserved, these cover the history of the Assyrians, Medes, Greeks, Lydians, and Persians. 

The Book 4 of his History was on A-bra-Ham (the monotheism, the Monad), so the historians have named him “a Jew”. However, he has done a work called “On the Psyche”, so he could have also been a Pythagorean or Platonist.

Nikolas wrote "A Life of Augustus", Caesar (Bios *“Καῖσαρ” KaiCaros =  pronounced as “Bios kai Caros”)

Nikolai writes the name of Cezar, in Ancient Homerian Greek as “Καῖσαρ” “Καίσαρος”, “Καίσαρι” sounding as: Kai Caros (meaning in Slavic "kao Car", or "as the King", the Slavic supreme ruler is “Car”) “Καίσαρ” became in Latin "Cezar".

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The First Musical Composition

Seikilos Epitaph The First Musical Composition Ancient Greece 100 AC Saturday 01 August 2020 at 4:29 pm

The Seikilos epitaph is carved in marble stele dated 100 AC from Ancient Greece

Did you know that the Seikilos epitaph is carved in marble stele, or a column, with poetry and music that is the oldest surviving complete music composition?

seikilos-marble-stele-the-socalled-seikilos-column-with-poetry-and-musical-notation-ancient-greek

Seikilos Epitaph The First Musical Composition Ancient Greece 100 AC at the Museum of Denmark

The melody with lyrics, in the ancient Greek musical notation, was found engraved on a tombstone from the Hellenistic town Tralles, not far from Ephesus in Turkey. The Epitaph was discovered in 1883 by Sir W. M. Ramsay, since it was lost to be rediscovered in 1922, Its base was sawn off straight so that it could stand as a pedestal for flowerpots. In 1966, it was acquired by the Museum of Denmark.

It is a Hellenistic song written in the Ionic dialect, that for me these days rings a bell as Eastern Greece or Alexander the Great or Macedonia or the famous Ancient Egyptian Rossetta Stone (with its 3 languages inscription) and many Ancient Greek scripts found in ancient Greek colonies in Egypt, Malta, Sicily.

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Ancient Greek Herodotus

or Researching Ancient History while Playing the Glass Bead Game with Pythagoras Sunday 12 July 2020 at 8:12 pm

Ancient Greek Herodotus Ἡρόδοτος 484 BC – 425 BC, the Father of History

A Barberian about Slavs and Ancient Europe, Balkan

by Nataša Pantović

History as Playing the Glass Bead Game with Pythagoras

In 1943, the Nobel wining novelist Herman Hesse published his novel The Glass Bead Game, Das Glasperlenspiel, set in a monastic society that develops minds by studying and playing the glass bead game. One would master philosophy and literature, and then focus on mathematics and music to be able to play the Game. Both mathematics and music are with us since the time of Pythagoras. History is like playing the Hesse's glass bead game with Pythagoras...

Mathematics is described as the science of pattern and music as the of pattern, both using meditation within the process of contemplation developing own language of .

The Ancient Greek Herodotus Ἡρόδοτος 484 BC – 425 BC (H-R-DATOS) as his name suggests was a King's historian, the one who collects data for the King or the Priest. It is hard to believe that a family would have given such a name to a child. (“Statistcians” you shall be, so we shall name you H-R-DaToS).

Fragment from the Herodotus Histories Papyrus 200 AC

Fragment from the Herodotus Histories Papyrus 200 AC

Aristotle refers to a version of The Histories written by "Herodotus of Thurium," and some passages in the Histories have been interpreted as proof that he wrote about southern Italy from his personal experience there. Of course, researching life and work of a person who has lived 2,500 years ago, everything about him or his work, but his writings, is a guess work used often in history to manipulate our minds to like or dislike a Ruler or a Nation, or a Political Party.

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Derveni Papyrus and Orphism

Metamorphoses Wednesday 20 May 2020 at 12:38 pm

Derveni Papyrus about Orphism and Ancient Greek s

Esoteric teachings of Golden Citizens of Ancient Greece

Learning from , and ancient by Natasa Pantovic

Metamorphoses. Transformation. A journey of a passing through Gaia, but also an epic poem in fifteen books written 2,000 years ago, by the Roman poet Ovid, completed in 8 AC inspired by the Ancient Greek Theogony Θεογονία “Birth of the Gods” attributed to Hesiod 700 BC, and the Derveni 500 BC.

Derveni-papyrus oldest ancient greek BC

The Oldest Greek Papyrus 500 BC Derveni Papyrus

The poet's writings are based on already fully established Ancient Greek manuscript tradition. Re-writing myths, the creation story, Ovid begins by describing how the elements emerge out of chaos, and how mankind degenerates from the Gold Age to the Silver Age to the Age of Iron. This is followed by an attempt by the giants (Titans) to seize the heavens, at which the God Jove sends a great flood which destroys all living things except one couple, Deucalion and Pyrrha.

The Metamorphoses, as a collection of myths is influenced by an earlier Greek work called the Theogony Θεογονία “Birth of the Gods” attributed to Hesiod 700 BC. It is a long narrative poem compiling Ancient Greek myths. Hesiod describes how the gods were created, their struggles with each other, and the nature of their divine rule. In the Theogony, the origin (arche / aRČe) is Chaos, a primordial condition, a gaping void (abyss), with the beginnings and the ends of the earth, sky, sea, gods, mankind. Symbolically associated with water, it is the source, origin, or root of things that exist. Then came Gaia (Earth), Tartarus (the cave like space under the earth), and Eros, who becomes the creator of the world.

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Temple of Artemis at Ephesus

Learning from Rudolf Steiner about Easter and Ancient Greek Moon Goddess Monday 27 April 2020 at 10:07 am

Esoteric teachings of Golden Citizens of Ancient Greece

by N Pantovic

Ancient Greek Myth and Artemis as the twin sister of Apollo

In Greek myth, Artemis is the twin sister of Apollo (Sun), a virgin huntress, the Greek goddess of the Moon, named Diana in Rome. On the coins she rests either arm on a staff formed of entwined serpents.

Alexander the Great and Arisotle with Artemis

At Ephesus, Turkey, we find remains of an Artemis (Ἄρτεμις ) Temple destroyed the very same day when Alexander the Great was born. When asked why wasn't she able to protect her own home, the temple in Ephesus, that was burnt by madmen in 356 BC, she said that she was in Pella, the capital of Macedonia (near Thessaloniki), assisting at Olympius and Philip son's birth. The Temple was so impressive that it was together with Egyptian pyramids listed as one of the 7 wonders of the world.

goddess-with-snakes-crete-kronoss-artmus-1600-bc

Minoan Snake Goddess Figurine 1600 BC Knossos, Crete

An inscription dating 300 BC, associates Ephesian Artemis with Crete: "To the Healer of diseases, to Apollo, Giver of Light to mortals, Eutyches has set up in votive offering [a statue of] the Cretan Lady of Ephesus, the Light-Bearer."

Rudolf Steiner in his Ephesian Mysteries Lecture meditates that the "two Initiates of the Ephesian Mysteries were reincarnated in Aristotle and in Alexander. And these Individualities then came near what was still to be felt of these things in their time in the Mysteries of Samothrace."

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